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Klutz Lego Chain Reactions Science/STEM Activity Kit

  • ASIN: 0545703301
  • Dimension: 9 * 1.25 * 10 inches
  • WEIGHT: 14.1 Ounces
  • Quantity Left: 999

PKR Rs. 7,664.00 /-


Product Description LEGO Chain Reactions is packed full of ideas, instructions, and inspiration for 10 LEGO machines that spin, swing, pivot, roll, lift, and drop. Each machine alone is awesome, but put them together and you get incredible chain reactions. Then, combine the machines in any order you like to create your own chain reactions. Our team of experts worked with educators and 11-year-olds to invent the machines, then wrote a book that teaches the skills (and some of the physics behind the fun) kids need to create their own amazing chain reaction machines. Our book includes 33 special LEGO elements that combine with basic bricks from your collection to make your machines go. But don’t worry that you won’t have the right bricks; we worked with the folks at LEGO to make sure you’ll need only the most common bricks, and that there are plenty of substitutes. The result is a chain reaction of fun, as one thing leads to another? and another? and another. Comes with: 78 page book, 33 LEGO elements, 6 LEGO balls, 6 feet of string, 8 paper ramps, 2 paper pop-up signs, 1 paper funnel ramp, 1 paper flag, 1 paper bucket, 1 platform From the Manufacturer Fascinate your friends by completing an ordinary task in an extraordinary way. Learn to build 10 LEGO machines that can swing, pivot, roll, lift, and drop. Then connect, rearrange, and experiment with the machines to create a chain reaction. With this book in hand and a handful of basic bricks from your LEGO collection, the only other thing you'll need is a little imagination. Includes 80-page book of instructions, 33 LEGO pieces, instructions for 10 machines, 6 plastic balls, string, paper ramps, and other components.

Specifications

Item Weight
14.1 ounces
ASIN
0545703301
Item model number
9780545703307
Manufacturer recommended age
8 - 15 years
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer
No
Release date
January 1, 2015
Language:
English
Mfg Recommended age
8 - 15 years
Manufacturer
Klutz Press

Product Description LEGO Chain Reactions is packed full of ideas, instructions, and inspiration for 10 LEGO machines that spin, swing, pivot, roll, lift, and drop. Each machine alone is awesome, but put them together and you get incredible chain reactions. Then, combine the machines in any order you like to create your own chain reactions. Our team of experts worked with educators and 11-year-olds to invent the machines, then wrote a book that teaches the skills (and some of the physics behind the fun) kids need to create their own amazing chain reaction machines. Our book includes 33 special LEGO elements that combine with basic bricks from your collection to make your machines go. But don’t worry that you won’t have the right bricks; we worked with the folks at LEGO to make sure you’ll need only the most common bricks, and that there are plenty of substitutes. The result is a chain reaction of fun, as one thing leads to another? and another? and another. Comes with: 78 page book, 33 LEGO elements, 6 LEGO balls, 6 feet of string, 8 paper ramps, 2 paper pop-up signs, 1 paper funnel ramp, 1 paper flag, 1 paper bucket, 1 platform From the Manufacturer Fascinate your friends by completing an ordinary task in an extraordinary way. Learn to build 10 LEGO machines that can swing, pivot, roll, lift, and drop. Then connect, rearrange, and experiment with the machines to create a chain reaction. With this book in hand and a handful of basic bricks from your LEGO collection, the only other thing you'll need is a little imagination. Includes 80-page book of instructions, 33 LEGO pieces, instructions for 10 machines, 6 plastic balls, string, paper ramps, and other components.

tenor1
Rating:5.0 out of 5 stars

Date:Reviewed in the United States on February 27, 2015

Review:This was not an easy concept for the authors and product planners to execute. It's radically different than just assembling Legos from an instruction booklet. A lot of thought and effort went into the chain reaction concepts and resulting projects. The book layout, the security so that the parts actually arrive at the consumer, the durability of the non Lego paper components, the directions on how to fold the paper components etc, etc, etc. are thoughtfully done. I think they struck a very good balance so this would not cost an arm and a leg. Some might call it cheap (a few Lego pieces, a beautiful well laid out instruction book with nicely printed paper components) but I call it cost effective. A lot of what you're paying for here is in my opinion is the wow factor of the book and the well thought out concepts. I supported my 7 year old grandson's effort to build the first project. My 5 year old grandson looked at what was involved and walked away I think because it looks complicated and the projects contain very few pieces. Both of them are very skilled Lego builders who pride themselves on their ability to throw lots of pieces together quickly. Does that sound familiar to you? So... I think what motivates most young Lego builders is assembling lots of pieces quickly and having a relatively static object to play with when done. The chain reaction projects aren't that at all. They don't look like much -to an adult - when complete. They are challenging in my view mostly because of the need for precision alignment between the paper parts and the Lego motion actuators the kids assemble to create the Chain the Reaction. Once assembled and aligned, making it function can require trial and error, motivation to succeed, precision hand and eye coordination and patience. I think that doing the first project successfully might be a make or break point for this product. Failure would surely be a deterrent towards doing subsequent projects in the book so initial success seems very important at least for younger children. The greatest joy my grandson experienced (and it was great joy) was the moment the first project functioned properly for the first time after several complete and partial failures (just as his patience was wearing thin) and then joy again once the chain reaction was rehearsed and easily repeatable so as to show his parents without failure. Having achieved this first success he was excited about doing more projects. It remains to be seen what his long term interest level will be. Yes.. This is radically different than just sticking prices together and success is not easy considering that the projects are minimalist in the total number of pieces. However I think the lessons and skills this product teaches are very important, worthwhile and noteworthy. Aside from the skills mentioned above this is also elementary physics of motion, weight, angle, momentum, etc. In summary, it appears that, assuming success along the way, the complicated chain reactions are fun for children to assemble, challenging to make fully, reliably functional and thrilling once they work for that first time. It's all good stuff! Read more

NikNak
Rating:3.0 out of 5 stars

Date:Reviewed in the United States on December 18, 2015

Review:Firstly - I bought this for a nephew for Christmas, so it hasn't yet been tested, but after reading some of the negative reviews, I thought I'd look through the book in detail to see exactly what you get (and don't get!). The premise is a good one, and I feel that it teaches some basic engineering ideas (levers, pulleys etc). The book seems well made, on quality paper. The Lego pieces supplied are mainly specialty pieces, to complete the machines. The real issue is the quantity of 'regular' blocks required from your own collection - 167 to be exact. Each machine lists what parts you need from the box, and then just states"plus some from your own collection". Well I took the liberty of listing out what "some" means. The list below is the minimum requirements to build each machine once - not all together, so you will need to disassemble one to build the next. The machines get increasingly larger, and more complicated. You can substitute more smaller pieces for the larger ones if you have them, so the list is not rigid. Bricks: 2x8 24of 2x6 5of 2x4 62of 2x3 2of 2x2 12of 1x6 6of 1x4 1of 1x2 21of 1x1 2of Plates: 2x8 1of 2x6 4of 2x4 7of 2x3 2of 2x2 2of 1x12 2of 1x6 6of 1x4 4of 1x2 2of Specialty pieces: Sloping brick 2x4 1of Tile 1x4 1of In addition - just out of curiosity, I priced up the total of purchasing these bricks through the Lego web store and it came out a little under $48. so your choices are - (a) buy the book, if you know the recipient has an extensive supply of excess Lego (b) buy the book, and the additional Lego you need (c) buy the book and get creative around what you can substitute for the additional required pieces - (book stacks are suggested in place of the towers, but I think would be unstable and difficult to get the components to align sufficiently for the machine to work). I give this 3 stars overall because I new this was a risky purchase, but I think it will still provide some educational value. Read more

K. Petersen
Rating:4.0 out of 5 stars

Date:Reviewed in the United States on December 28, 2017

Review:GREAT BOOK but my young kids needed help finding the extra parts needed. You can easily substitute parts (like a 2x4 and a 2x2 for a 2x6) but my young kids did better with the exact parts listed. You need All Essential Parts included with the book AND ones below: PART #INCLUDED+#MORE NEEDED 32001 plate 2x6 with holes 2+0, 3700 brick 1x2 with hole 1+0 59426 cross axle 5,5 stud - stop 2+0, 92402 tire 1+0, 55981 hub 1+0, 3895 1x12 with holes 6+4, 4287 1x3 slope inverted 1+1, 30000 Bearing Element 2x2 5+6, 3708 Cross Axle 12 stud 2+1, 3706 Cross Axle 6 stud 1+1, 6590 bushing 4+1, 6562 axle peg 3+1, 32034 angle connector(180)1+1, 32013 angle connector(0) 1+1 EXTRA BRICKS NEEDED 1x1 +3, 1x2 +35, 1x3 +10, 1x4 +17, 1x6 +21,2x2 +27,2x3 +3, 2x4 +197, 2x6 +6, 2x8 +86, EXTRA PLATES NEEDED 1x4 +8, 1x6 +4, 1x12 +2, 2x2 +2, 2x4 +15, 2x6 +3, 2x8 +4 EXTRA TILE NEEDED 1x4 +1 EXTRA SLOPE NEEDED 2x4 +15 Read more

A. M. Thomas
Rating:5.0 out of 5 stars

Date:Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2016

Review:Wow! Not sure who is having more fun, my husband or the kids (5 and 7 years.) They love engineering, building, projects, etc. If you are like-minded this shouldn't disappoint. Read more

The Mikeybumster
Rating:

Date:Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 7, 2018

Review:I’ll admit I bought this book in order to harvest the included LEGO parts. If you google “great ball contraption” you’ll find a plethora of LEGO machines whose sole purpose is the transportation of tiny balls from one module to the next. Being an avid fan of LEGO since childhood, I’ve long since dreamed of creating my own GBC. Official LEGO balls are (relatively) difficult and expensive to obtain but six are included here, together with another 33 LEGO elements, making this book relatively good value for money for the parts alone. As for the book, it contains blueprints for see-saws, dead falls and other simple contraptions. These can be combined so that each machine triggers the next in line, much like a Heath Robinson contraption. The author assumes the reader owns more LEGO than the handful of bricks supplied and also uses additional parts that make a LEGO purist like myself balk. Yet, as an introduction to using LEGO for engineering rather than model building this book is sure to spark the imagination. Read more

Renee
Rating:

Date:Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 6, 2019

Review:Your browser does not support HTML5 video. My son loves this product as he is crazy about physics and it was nice to be able to demonstrate it using legos. Read more

pjae27
Rating:

Date:Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 9, 2019

Review:Great xmas present. Such a cheap way to do lego. We had lots of standard bricks so this just gives you the extra fancy ones with cardboard cut outs to make the marble runs. It was lots of fun and the easy to follow instructions were great for my 5 year old son. The instructions are in a sturdy wirebound book so haven't got torn/lost like many lego products. We did have to buy a few containers to keep the lego in as the plastic pouch is pretty disposable and you can't really keep it in there. But overall, we thoroughly enjoyed and would definitely recommend. I'd say for 5+ Read more

Amazon Customer
Rating:

Date:Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 26, 2019

Review:I really wanted to love this, but it has two major downfalls for us: 1. It requires a huge number of other lego blocks. We have quite a lot of lego, but apparently not nearly enough 2x8 bricks for this book. 2. It's just too fiddly for my son. He's aged nearly 4, big Lego enthusiast, but fine motor skills just not quite there for this book. Having said that, mine aren't either. You have to get each stage set up exactly right, and if something along the way is slightly awry, the whole thing fails to work. Woe betide you if you have an eager toddler watching too. I'd suggest going for the Lego Gadgets book in the same series instead. It includes all the pieces you need, and is far less fiddly. Read more

Victoria Sullivan
Rating:

Date:Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 7, 2018

Review:My 7 year old loves Lego so I thought this would be something different. However, after doing the first 'machine' in the book, which was quite fun, he has not shown much interest in doing more. Some of the projects involve making dominoes out of Lego which is a bit dull, and not as interesting as the levers and balances I hope this would have more of. Nice idea but could do with more smaller projects he could do himself. Read more